Tag

Indigofera

Browsing

The A/W 2015 Copenhagen Shows Had Some Great Denim On Offer Like Berlin, the Copenhagen trade show scene was seeing quite a bit of change this time around. Gallery in Forum was replaced by something that actually looked like an art gallery and the CIFF Raven, Øksnehallen and Terminal 2 had come back to life as the Revolver show. Our editor-in-chief reports. Eat Dust Goes 70s on us For A/W 2015, the Belgium biker fashionistas return to denim. Their focus has been elsewhere for the past few seasons, but with this collection marking their 5th anniversary, they wanted to get back to their roots. Inspiration obviously comes from the 70s, but Rob and Keith also had the Oscar-winning Cohen brothers movie No Country For Old Men in mind when they sat at the drawing board. The 13.5 oz. denim for the 70s-theme is made by Collect. For the first season, it’s only available in their new bootcut fit. The denim is also available in their Sherpa vest and worker jacket. All denims and a few of the shirting fabrics are Japanese while the rest is Portuguese. Eat Dust have all of their garments made in Portugal (by Portuguese nationals); something they’re proud of. Livid Jeans Blow Us Away With Awesome Tops Our Norwegian brothers are taking giant leaps each season. Basically, they haven’t changed their winning recipe of classic shirts, jackets, and jeans, they’ve just added even more exotic spices. Most shirting fabrics are narrow loom and many are from Nihon Menpu in Japan. They’ve also done some great jackets with a 100% British wool fabric made by Abraham Moon and Sons that have been waxed and bonded with a layer of Teflon. For jeans, the A/W 2015 retail collection will see the launch of a new slim straight fit, the Jone.…

The Story of Indigofera started with one natural indigo denim with an almost unbelievable price If you ask me, Indigofera is one of the most underrated denim brands in the market. The uniquely developed denims are amazing, the fits are spot on, and the details are subtle yet striking. However, prices are relatively high and some aficionados may question the “Made in Portugal” label, not to mention the missing chain stitched hem. Once you understand that the brand is all about fabrics that fade unbelievably beautifully, you forget all the snobbery and actually start to appreciate that these guys dare to do it different. Found the Fabric in Japan by Change While developing Indigofera back in 2007-2008, founders Mats Andersson and Johan Söderlund did a lot of researching and prototyping. At one point early in the process they came by one truly exceptional fabric milled at one of the small premium mills in Japan’s Okayama area. They ended up using it for their first production run. The Details of the Natural Indigo Fabric The weight of this special loom state denim is 16 oz., but more importantly it’s 100% natural indigo dyed. Using rope-dyeing techniques the dyestuff hasn’t penetrated to the core of the yarn. The result is amazing fades. Mats tells me that natural indigo-dyed denim has a tendency to over-bleed and saturate the entire fabric, but the rope dyeing means this doesn’t happen to this denim. He admits that launching the brand with a ‘kick-ass’ fabric like this it may have been a bit premature. “I do not think I have seen anything more beautiful before or after this fabric came our way. And there was only 100 metres done, how can anyone resist that?” To Mats’ knowledge, aside from those magical 100 metres, the fabric has not been produce…

Sweden’s Indigofera is one of those brands that will probably never reach the mainstream. Founder Mats Andersson is simply not interested in making the short cuts it takes to move it up to the big league. And don’t get me wrong, this is exactly what I love about the brand. In my book, Indigofera stands for dedication and commitment to make the best, no bull shit jeans for diehard denim enthusiasts. I caught up with Mats to discuss the loom state Japanese Shrink-to-Prima-Fit denim and the ideas that went into it. So, you guys design and develop all fabrics and denims yourself.  Could you tell our readers a little about the process of developing a denim? “In the case of our Shrink-to-Prima-Fit we worked with one of our Japanese mills that also produced the 100% natural indigo 16 oz. denim we did back in 2009. We wanted the character of 100% natural indigo in a fabric that could be slightly more accessible in terms of price point. Still, the rope dye gives it a slight unevenness in colour and the white core of the indigo dyed ring-spun yarn comes out rather irregularly. The aging process is fantastic and the blue and white shimmer after the first hand wash.” Did you have any concerns about going into the shrink-to-fit market? “It is a real challenge to market a fabric like this. It’s only for the daring denim lovers. Maybe like a single malt with smokey character. It takes time and guts to appreciate it, but it gives you a more personalised fit in my opinion.” As with all Indigofera jeans, the Clint Shrink-to-Prima-Fit is sewn with cotton/polyester thread and has a chromed cow leather patch. What are you most proud of with this denim? “I’m proud to have retailers supporting us by buying this fabric to show their customers what jeans can be about. Just getting it on…

A few years back the so called “heritage wave” swept across the fashion industry and brought raw jeans and worker boots to every imaginable fashionista, who didn’t know the first thing about denim or leather and basically couldn’t care less. Now, in the speed of light, the insatiable industry has turned to the next new fad, but for those of us that feel comfortable on the “heritage” shelve, we now have it to ourselves. During this summer’s Copenhagen Fashion Week, the second edition of the “loudest, friendliest and most rugged event” took place at the Wrenchmonkees garage; the Iron&Denim ‘trade show.’ A celebration of honestly made products, the love for roaring engines and good friendships, Iron&Denim is a small “fuck you” to the established fashion industry. And the Monkees are clearly not the only ones ready for something else than mingling with the common fashion mob. In case you didn’t make it there, this is what you missed out on.